• Buber 2021-2022
  • The Martin Buber Society  of Fellows committed to the highest standards of academic excellence and to a strong interdisciplinary orientation. Our goal is to foster innovative, path-breaking research of broad cultural meaning and relevance and to create a community of scholars who can learn from and inspire one another.
FM
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    The best thing about the MBSF is that you get time to read up on subjects and think things through. Here you have the time, and the comfort of a community of other fellows. Many of my colleagues grew to be very important to me both intellectually and socially.

    Ellinor Morack, Germany
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    The best thing about the MBSF is that you get time to read up on subjects and think things through. Here you have the time, and the comfort of a community of other fellows. Many of my colleagues grew to be very important to me both intellectually and socially.

    Ellinor Morack, Germany

FEATURED PUBLICATIONS

The Neo-Aramaic Oral Heritage of the Jews of Zakho
Oz Aloni. 2022. The Neo-Aramaic Oral Heritage of the Jews of Zakho. Cambridge: Open Book Publishers. Abstract
Aloni focuses on three genres of the Zakho community's oral heritage: the proverb, the enriched biblical narrative and the folktale . Each chapter draws on the authors' own fieldwork among members of the Zakho community now living in Jerusalem. He examines the proverb in its performative context, the rewritten biblical epic narrative of Ruth, Naomi and King David, and a folktale with the unusual theme of magical gender transformation. Insightfully breaking down these examples with analysis drawn from a variety of conceptual fields, Aloni succeeds in his mission to put the speakers of the language and their culture on equal footing with their speech.
Indonesians and Their Arab World: Guided Mobility among Labor Migrants and Mecca Pilgrims

Southeast Asia Program Publications Cornell University Press

Indonesians and Their Arab World explores the ways contemporary Indonesians understand their relationship to the Arab world. Despite being home to the largest Muslim population in the world, Indonesia exists on the periphery of an Islamic world centered around the Arabian Peninsula. Mirjam Lücking approaches the problem of interpreting the current conservative turn in Indonesian Islam by considering the ways personal relationships, public discourse, and matters of religious self-understanding guide two groups of Indonesians who actually travel to the Arabian Peninsula—labor migrants and Mecca pilgrims—in becoming physically mobile and making their mobility meaningful. This concept, which Lücking calls "guided mobility," reveals that changes in Indonesian Islamic traditions are grounded in domestic social constellations and calls claims of outward Arab influence in Indonesia into question. With three levels of comparison (urban and rural areas, Madura and Central Java, and migrants and pilgrims), this ethnographic case study foregrounds how different regional and socioeconomic contexts determine Indonesians' various engagements with the Arab world.

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