• More about us
  • The Martin Buber Society  of Fellows committed to the highest standards of academic excellence and to a strong interdisciplinary orientation. Our goal is to foster innovative, path-breaking research of broad cultural meaning and relevance and to create a community of scholars who can learn from and inspire one another.

FOCUS

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    The best thing about the MBSF is that you get time to read up on subjects and think things through. Here you have the time, and the comfort of a community of other fellows. Many of my colleagues grew to be very important to me both intellectually and socially.

    Ellinor Morack, Germany
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    The best thing about the MBSF is that you get time to read up on subjects and think things through. Here you have the time, and the comfort of a community of other fellows. Many of my colleagues grew to be very important to me both intellectually and socially.

    Ellinor Morack, Germany

FEATURED PUBLICATIONS

Esoteric Images: Decoding the Late Herat School of Painting
In Esoteric Images: Decoding the Late Herat School of Painting Tawfiq Daʿadli decodes the pictorial language which flourished in the city of Herat, modern Afghanistan, under the rule of the last Timurid ruler, Sultan Husayn Bayqara (r.1469-1506). This study focuses on one illustrated manuscript of a poem entitled Khamsa by the Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi, kept in the British Library under code Or.6810. Tawfiq Daʿadli decodes the paintings, reveals the syntax behind them and thus deciphers the message of the whole manuscript. The book combines scholarly efforts to interpret theological-political lessons embedded in one of the foremost Persian schools of art against the background of the court dynamic of an influential medieval power in its final years.
Sammy Gronemann Kritische Gesamtausgabe

Sammy Gronemann’s first literary success was his 1920 bestseller Tohuwabohu. This satirical novel is a period piece that marks the start of Gronemann’s literary career and presents a humorous portrait of Jewish life in Berlin after the turn of the century. Albert Einstein considered it a “masterpiece” because of its perspicacious and lucid depiction of the many facets of German Judaism. This annotated version includes yet unpublished documents, extensive commentaries and an overview over the book’s reception history, along with a short essay on the impact of the book’s title on the German language.

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